Disney movie night……

So, this weekend past we were faced with an off the cuff comment (as informative as it may have been) from the eldest stating something that made my husbands face drop….

In the middle of watching a Disney movie (which had a family in it talking about their day at school etc.) we told my eldest SS that we were proud of his Intrim Report which was excellent. This led into us talking about other school things and how we ordered something on the school website for him to which he asked “how did you find me”? Finding this odd, we asked what he meant. Long story short, he said that he thought he was registered in school under BM’s last name. Which then led to him stating that “Mommy told me that she has paperwork to fill out to change our last name to hers”.

I tried to control my voice and told them both (7 & 4yrs) that I didn’t know that and that I believed that they couldn’t change their name until they were 19yrs old and that I think Daddy and Mommy both had to agree to it before that would happen. My husband was devastated. You could see his face drop a mile away. What is WRONG with this woman that she can’t just leave well alone? We all know she is bitter and twisted but to constantly put the children through this….and TELL them about it…simply as she has nothing better to do is ludicrous.

Her parenting is abysmal. I am embarrassed for her. I understand that it drives her INSANE that I have the same last name as the kids….and that they look more like my children than they do hers, but this is ridiculous. What kind of example is this continuing to set for the children?

I could understand if a woman didn’t know who the Father was…or he was not in the child’s life or even for their safety but for NO reason other than because SHE wants it that way is sickening to me. It’s happening first hand to us, but I would feel this way for any poor couple that had to deal with this kind of selfish behavior.

Simply proves yet another Narcissistic character trait. ALL ABOUT HER.

*sigh* I really do hope that she can’t or doesn’t follow through with this. I have had a look online and discussed this with a colleague who used to work in Social Services and it appears that there is a chance that she could…….

Honestly, I would assume that as she could not give good reason enough for “the system” to honor a waiver of the required signature from my husband….but the way the Justice system works these days…I just don’t know. 😦

Below is information from BC Vital Statistics for anyone’s reference on this matter:

Government of B.C.

Legal Change of Name Application

The Application for Change of Name accommodates many potential situations for a name change. Some parts of the application may not apply to you and may be left blank.
You can help us process your application smoothly by thoroughly reading this page, which provides you with information about who can apply, what steps are required, and what documentation is needed for your particular situation, including consent and fingerprints.The average legal change of name application takes four to six weeks to process. We cannot process applications that are missing documentation or payment.

Who can Apply for a Legal Change of Name?

To be eligible for a legal change of name, applicants must:

  • be 19 years of age or older;
    Exception: If you are younger than 19 years old and a parent with custody of your child, you may apply for a legal change of name.
  • be changing their own name, or the name of their child for whom they have custody who is 18 years of age or younger; and
  • have lived in B.C. or had a permanent residence here for at least three months immediately before the application date.

How to Apply for a Legal Change of Name

These are the basic steps for applying to change your name legally.

  1. Read the instructions included in the Application for Change of Name (VSA 529) form (PDF, 476KB) and look through the application first without filling anything out. Make a note of which documents, waivers, or signatures you need to obtain to complete the application.
  2. Complete the application. All applicants must complete Parts1 (a) and (b). If you are a parent changing the name of your child, you must also complete Part 2.
  3. Submit the Application for Change of Name along with the required documents and payment in one of the following two ways:

By Mail

Vital Statistics Agency
PO Box 9657 Stn Prov Govt
Victoria, B.C.
V8W 9P3
ATTN: CONFIDENTIAL SERVICES

In Person

Go to any Service BC location.Cost

Adult (19 years of age or older) without dependent child (18 years old or younger) $137
Adult (19 years of age or older) with dependent child (18 years old or younger) $137 + $27 per child
Child (18 years of age or younger) $137 for first or only child $27 per additional child
Birth or Marriage Search $27 if event occurred in B.C. AND an original certificate is not enclosed

The cost of a legal change of name includes a Certificate of Name Change listing the old and new names of all individuals involved in the application.It does not include the cost of:

  • Fingerprinting
  • Criminal record checks
  • Witnessing your signature on a statutory declaration
  • Certifying documents
  • New identification following the name change

Note: Service BC representatives can witness your signature, and copy and certify documents to submit with your application for a small fee.Required Documentation

The table below describes the different types of applicants for name changes. Every time a description on the left side of the table matches your circumstance, you should submit the documentation listed to its right in the table.

If you… Submit this…
Are an adult, 19 years of age or older who was born in Canada. An original birth certificate with registration number
Are an adult, 19 years of age or older who was born outside of Canada. certified copy of immigration and/or citizenship documents
Have changed your name before. Your original Change of Name certificate(s)
Have documents that are not in English. Certified English translations of the documents
Got married in B.C. and are not divorced or widowed. Original British Columbia marriage certificate(s) or photocopy if the marriage certificate already lists the new name
Got married outside of B.C. or Canada. Photocopy of marriage certificate(s) including registration number
Are changing the name of your child who was born in Canada. Your child’s original birth certificate listing the name of the parent or parents
Are changing the name of your child who was born outside of Canada. Certified copies of the following:

  • Immigration or citizenship documents
  • An original birth certificate or adoption papers from the country of birth showing parentage.

Provide certified English translations if these are not in English.

Are changing the name of your child, but the name you use now is different from the one listed on your child’s birth certificate. Documentation showing how you came to have your current name. (i.e. marriage certificate(s), change of name certificate(s), letter of explanation.)
Are changing your child’s last name to the last name of your spouse. photocopy of your marriage certificate and your spouse’s consent.
Changing the name of your child who is 12 to 18 years of age. A short letter written by your child providing his or her reasons for wanting a change of name.* Remember to have your child sign the application on page 5.

Required Consent when Changing a Child’s Name

If you are changing the name of your child… You must obtain consent from…
And a second parent is listed on your child’s birth registration The other parent.If you cannot obtain consent, request a waiver of parental consent
And your child is 12 years of age or older Your child.See Part 2 (page 5) of the application. Your child must also write a brief letter stating why he or she wants the name change
To match the last name of your spouse Your spouse.See Part 2 (page 5) of the application.

Requesting a Waiver of Parental Consent

The Name Act allows for consideration of a waiver of the other parent’s consent. The following is a list of situations for which a waiver of parental consent may be approved. If you would like to request a waiver of the other parent’s consent, consider which situation described below best describes yours and provide all the requested information.

Situation A

The person whose consent is required is not recorded on the birth registration of the child whose name is to be changed (Section 4.6 of the Name Act).What you need to provide:

  • If the child was born in Canada, you must provide an original birth certificate showing parentage.
  • If the child was born outside of Canada, you must provide a certified photocopy of the child’s birth documents showing parentage. If the birth documents are not in English, you must provide a translated version from an accredited individual.

Situation B

The person whose consent is required cannot be located after a reasonable, diligent and adequate search has been conducted as demonstrated by the statutory declaration and supporting evidence maintained in the change of name file (Section 4.5(a) of the Name Act).What you need to provide:

  1. include the mailing address and any other contact information for the parent whose consent is to be waived. If you are unaware of the other parent’s whereabouts, search his or her name on Canada411.ca using Canada as the location, and submit a printout of the results;
  2. indicate if you receive child support. If you are registered with the Family Maintenance Enforcement Program (FMEP), you must include a copy of your most recent statement; and
  3. explain all efforts you have made to contact the other parent, including contact with relatives, email contact, etc.
  • A brief letter written by the child if he or she is 12 years of age or older. Have your child describe why he or she would like a change of name.

Situation C

The person whose consent is required is deceased, proven by a copy of a death certificate maintained in the change of name file (Section 4.6 of the Name Act).What you need to provide:

Situation D

A person whose consent is required is unreasonably withholding their consent (Section 4(5)(b) of the Name Act).What you need to provide:

  1. include the mailing address and any other contact information for the parent whose consent is to be waived;
  2. indicate if you receive child support. If you are registered with the Family Maintenance Enforcement Program (FMEP), you must include a copy of your most recent statement; and
  3. explain all efforts you have made to contact the other parent, including contact with relatives, email contact, etc.
  • A brief letter written by the child if he or she is 12 years of age or older. Have your child describe why he or she would like a change of name.

Situation E

A person whose consent is required is mentally disordered, as demonstrated by statutory declaration and supporting evidence (Section 4.5(a) of the Name Act).What you need to provide:

  • A copy of a court order, showing you have custody of your child.
  • A letter from a physician/court order stating that the person whose consent is to be waived is incapable of understanding what he or she would be signing.

Situation F

Exceptional circumstances make it unreasonable to seek the consent of the required individual (Section 4(6) of the Name Act).What you need to provide:

  • A copy of a court order, showing you have custody of your child.
  • One of the following:
    • A court ordered no contact order.
    • A court ordered restraining order.
    • A letter from the police indicating you would be in danger if you attempted to contact the parent whose consent is required.

Note: The requirements identified here are a guide only and the registrar general of the Vital Statistics Agency has the authority to ask for additional information.Note: Statements made in a statutory declaration are considered the equivalent of statements made in a court of law and may provide the basis for action against the applicant if they are proven to be fraudulent.Fingerprint Information

If you are both 18 years of age or older AND are changing your name, the Name Act requires you to have your fingerprints taken as part of a criminal record check. If you have a criminal record, the name change is noted in the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) database. Fingerprints are only used for the purpose required by the Name Act and confirmation of the criminal record review is returned to the applicant directly from the RCMP.Effective July 1, 2014, only electronic fingerprints are accepted. You can have your fingerprints taken electronically at any of the following facilities:

  • Most RCMP detachments
  • Vancouver Police
  • Victoria Police
  • Any RCMP-accredited fingerprinting company or its affiliate who submit fingerprints electronically for the purposes of criminal record checks. For a list of accredited companies and information about affiliates, visit: www.rcmp.gc.ca/cr-cj/index-eng.htm

What to Submit with your Change of Name Application

Different agencies may charge different amounts for fingerprinting, but a criminal record check is always $25. Pay these fees directly to the agency you have chosen to take your electronic fingerprints and perform a criminal record check.Once you have paid for the fingerprinting service and criminal record check, the fingerprinting official will give you a receipt. Submit a photocopy of the original receipt with your application.

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